Programme

The European Conference on Education (ECE) is an interdisciplinary conference held alongside The European Conference on Language Learning (ECLL). Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. Registration for either conference will allow participants to attend sessions in both.

This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Thursday, July 14Friday, July 15Saturday, July 16Sunday, July 17

All times are British Summer Time (UTC+1)
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Location: Online

09:00-09:20: Online Conference Opening Address

09:20-10:15: Livestream Featured Presentation

10:15-10:20: Break

10:20-12:00: Livestream Presentation Session 1

12:00-12:10: Break

12:10-13:25: Livestream Presentation Session 2

13:25-13:40: Break

13:40-15:20: Livestream Presentation Session 3

All times are British Summer Time (UTC+1)
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Location: SOAS University of London, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

09:00-10:00: Conference Registration

10:00-10:10: Announcements

10:10-10:25: Welcome Address & Recognition of IAFOR Scholarship Winners

10:25-11:10: Keynote Presentation

11:10-11:40: Coffee Break

11:40-12:25: Keynote Presentation

12:25-13:45: Lunch Break

13:45-14:45: Keynote Presentation

14:45-15:15: Extended Coffee Break

15:15-16:15: Keynote Presentation

16:15-16:20: Conference Photograph

16:20-17:20: Conference Welcome Reception & Poster Session

All times are British Summer Time (UTC+1)
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Location: University College London (UCL), Torrington Place

09:00-10:00: Conference Registration

09:30-10:20: On-site Workshop Session

10:20-10:40: Coffee Break

10:40-12:20: On-site Parallel Session 1

12:20-13:20: Lunch Break

13:20-14:35: On-site Parallel Session 2

14:35-14:50: Coffee Break

14:50-16:30: On-site Parallel Session 3

18:00-20:00: Conference Dinner (Optional)

All times are British Summer Time (UTC+1)
Use our time converter tool to show times in your timezone.

Location: University College London (UCL), Torrington Place

09:00-10:00: Conference Registration

09:30-10:20: On-site Workshop Session

10:20-10:40: Coffee Break

10:40-12:20: On-site Parallel Session 1

12:20-13:20: Lunch Break

13:20-14:35: On-site Parallel Session 2

14:35-14:50: Coffee Break

14:50-16:05: On-site Parallel Session 3

16:05-16:20: Conference Closing Address


Featured Presentations

  • Building Capacity through Socially Responsible, Community-engaged Higher Education
    Building Capacity through Socially Responsible, Community-engaged Higher Education
    Keynote Presentation: Birgit Phillips
  • Transdisciplinarity in Education
    Transdisciplinarity in Education
    Keynote Presentation: Nick Tyler
  • Fighting Deficit Views of English Foreign Language Learners and Users
    Fighting Deficit Views of English Foreign Language Learners and Users
    Keynote Presentation: Jean-Marc Dewaele

Conference Programme

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on June 13, 2022. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.


Important Information Emails

All registered attendees will receive an Important Information email and updates in the run-up to the conference. Please check your email inbox for something from "iafor.org". If you can not find these emails in your normal inbox, it is worth checking in your spam or junk mail folders as many programs filter out emails this way. If these did end up in one of these folders, please add the address to your acceptable senders' folder by whatever method your email program can do this.


Pre-Recorded Virtual Presentations

A number of presenters have submitted pre-recorded virtual video presentations. We encourage you to watch these presentations and provide feedback through the video comments.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ECE conferences via the links below.

Building Capacity through Socially Responsible, Community-engaged Higher Education
Keynote Presentation: Birgit Phillips

With the planet undergoing a slow-motion ecological catastrophe, and humanity facing a surge in inequality, xenophobia and racism, more and more people are asking difficult questions about the complicity of higher education systems in compounding these issues. Although many universities have acknowledged their pivotal role in making the world a better place by adopting Third Mission statements that pledge their social responsibility, their education paradigms too often remain anchored in a profoundly neoliberal agenda that almost exclusively values competitiveness and employability. Rather than promoting inclusive, global citizenship education and engaging critically with the problems of hegemonial systems, higher education institutions frequently function as silos, where knowledge and learning are seen as commodities whose function is to build narrow competences suited to meeting market demands. Such education reinforces the present widespread inequality brought about by capitalism, rather than working towards greater economic and social justice.

In this presentation, I will begin by examining the prevailing and often contradictory education discourses in Europe. I will look at how we conceptualise education itself, both its intended objectives and its processes, as well as how we view our roles as educators trying to navigate within the contested space of higher education. I will then go on to discuss how universities can help build fairer, more inclusive and democratic societies that provide a dignified life for everyone on the planet. Drawing on critical pedagogies and interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives, I will emphasise the collective dimension of learning, as well as the importance of embracing epistemological diversity and critical literacy in order to foster a democratic ethos which understands education as an instrument for social change. I will argue that such a system of empowered individuals striving towards a shared vision can lead to increased resiliency in learners, educators, institutions, and the communities with which they are engaged. Along the way, I will draw on my own experiences as a practitioner in the field and offer some examples of integrating community-engaged practices into higher education curricula.

Read presenter's biography
Transdisciplinarity in Education
Keynote Presentation: Nick Tyler

The 20th century has seen a general increase in the number of disciplines that can be distinguished in the world at large, and thus in the offer to be found in educational institutions around the world. Undoubtedly we are a long way away from the "Natural Philosophy" of a few centuries ago – and even from the title of the first Professor of Engineering in England, John Millington, the "Professor of Engineering and the Application of Mechanical Philosophy to the Arts" at UCL at its foundation in 1827. Perhaps it is the increase in capability of analysis that has driven this trend – the ritual taking apart of concepts that characterises 'analysis' – but the question is whether this is actually helpful for the world in the 21st century. Given the overarching complexity of the world in which we now live, such analysis is destined to be unhelpful – the effects of one discipline on another become too complex to analyse at any world-meaning scale. Now, we realise that systems are inherently complex and that perhaps a better model for the world's functionality is that of a biological interactive organism rather than a non-reactive physical structure. This realisation has the potential to change education in universities, for example, where the meaning of university might have become tied to the idea of separate universes of many disciplines, and now might need to be something more of the all-embracing universe of a vital organism composed of many other organisms. This talk discusses the implications of this shift for universities, in how they work, are organised and are designed.

Read presenter's biography
Fighting Deficit Views of English Foreign Language Learners and Users
Keynote Presentation: Jean-Marc Dewaele

In this presentation I will argue that the traditional deficit view about (English) foreign language learners and users (the so-called failure to reach “native-speaker” standard) is the result of narrow-minded monolingual ideologies and is harmful to learners, teachers and foreign language users. Rather than obsessing about deficit, we should acknowledge gaps but also rejoice about progress, and accept that “imperfect” foreign language users are just as legitimate as first language users, and that their foreign accent and odd mistake is as much part of them as the colour of their eyes and hair (Dewaele, 2018; Dewaele et al. 2021).

Read presenter's biography
References

Dewaele, J.-M. (2018) Why the dichotomy ‘L1 Versus LX User’ is better than ‘Native Versus Non-native Speaker’. Applied Linguistics, 39(2), 236-240.
Dewaele, J.-M., Bak, T. & Ortega, L. (2021) Why the mythical “native speaker” has mud on its face. In N. Slavkov, S. Melo Pfeifer & N. Kerschhofer ‎ (Eds.), The Changing Face of the "Native Speaker": Perspectives from Multilingualism and Globalization. Berlin: Mouton De Gruyter, pp. 23-43.

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